Moral concepts in traditional Serbian epic poetry.
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Moral concepts in traditional Serbian epic poetry. by Jovan Brkić

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Published by Mouton in "S-Gravenhage .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Epic poetry, Serbian -- History and criticism

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesSlavistic printings and reprintings -- 24
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPG1452 B7 1961
The Physical Object
Pagination177p.
Number of Pages177
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15199462M

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Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Serb epic poetry (Serbian: Српске епске народне песме/Srpske epske narodne pesme) is a form of epic poetry created by Serbs originating in today's Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro and North Macedonia. The main cycles were composed by unknown Serb authors between the 14th and 19th centuries. Songs of Serbian epic poetry rarely, if ever, rhyme, but they are easy to remember as each line has exactly ten syllables and caesura after fourth syllable. An older form, called Bugarshtica, exists, which has fifteen to sixteen syllables. Songs could be recited, but traditionally they are sung along musical instrument called Gusle. traditional oral genres and folklorized, the themes of charity and poor relief were accepted and transformed according to the conventions specific to the poetic world of the oral genre in question. In Serbian epic poetry, charity and poor relief are represented in a range of structural forms. It should be noted that the word for “the poor”.

Serb epic poetry is a form of epic poetry created by Serbs originating in today's Serbia and Herzegovina, Croatia and North Macedonia. The main cycles were composed by unknown Serb authors between the 19th centuries, they are concerned with historical events and personages. The instrument accompanying the epic poetry is the gusle. Gusle, the guardian of memories. The epic poems are the result of the people’s creativity, they were passed from generation to generation and until XIX century they were seldom used due to the major changes that happened in this region. They occur in all areas where the Serbs lived. The epic songs give two contradictory reasons for the Serbian defeat: the treachery of Vuk Brankovic - which seems to have no basis in fact - and Lazar's decision before the battle to sacrifice his earthly kingdom for a heavenly kingdom, to lead his men into battle knowing what the tragic outcome was to be as one might lead a host of martyrs. Six Elements Of The Epic: 1) Plot centers around a Hero of Unbelievable Stature. The epic hero completes what everyone only attempts. In ancient epics, the hero often is either partially divine or at least protected by a god or God. 2) Involves deeds of superhuman strength and valor. Accomplish feats no real human could.

Epic - Epic - Later variations: Latin epic poetry was initiated in the 3rd century bce by Livius Andronicus, who translated the Odyssey into the traditional metre of Saturnian verse. It was not until the 1st century bce, however, that Rome possessed a truly national epic in the unfinished Aeneid of Virgil, who used Homer as his model. The story of Aeneas’s journey, recounted in the first six. THE BATTLE OF KOSOVO Serbian Epic Poems cycle of heroic ballads is generally considered the finest work of Serbian folk poetry. Commemorating the Serbian Empire's defeat at the h ands of the Turks in the late fourteenth century, these "a great thing as far as the modern reception of Serbian traditional culture is concerned." Charles SimicFile Size: 90KB. Serbian epic poetry is a form of epic poetry written by Serbs originating in today's Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia and main cycles were composed by unknown artists between 14th and 19th century (although some of the later poems are commonly attributed to Filip Višnjic).They are mostly concerned with historical events and personages, though with varying. The Epic of Sundiata:Using African Literature in the Classroom Margaret Lo Piccolo Sullivan. Introducing high school students to an “out of culture experience” can be , as the world history curriculum broadens from its European focus to a more global one, teachers need to find ways to move beyond a “names, dates, and places” approach to non-European studies.