Emergency planning zones for serious nuclear power plant accidents
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Emergency planning zones for serious nuclear power plant accidents

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Published by The Office in [Sacramento?] .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • California.

Subjects:

  • Nuclear power plants -- Accidents -- California.,
  • Civil defense -- California.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementState of California, Office of Emergency Services.
ContributionsCalifornia. Office of Emergency Services.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsTK1344.C2 E44 1980
The Physical Object
Pagination1 v. (various pagings) :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3923390M
LC Control Number81620855

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Managing Nuclear Accidents: A Model Emergency Response Plan For Power Plants And Communities [Golding, Dominic, Kasperson, Jeanne X, Kasperson, Roger, Goble, Robert, Seley, John, Thompson, Gordon] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Managing Nuclear Accidents: A Model Emergency Response Plan For Power Plants And CommunitiesAuthors: Dominic Golding, Jeanne X Kasperson. coordinate safety during & after a nuclear power plant accident. Know where your community lies. Link: [link to map showing PA power plants and zones] Image: nuclear power plant Did you know? About 5 million Americans live within 10 miles of a nuclear facility. Are you one of them? Know your emergency plans. [4],[5]. Moreover, focus on performance of nuclear emergency exercises [6], discussed Evacuation in case of a nuclear power plant accident [7]. For most emergency types, response takes place over two distinct areas namely: the first is On-site area, with NPP facilities, this Author: Shaaban Abdalla Selouma Mohamed, Lim, Hak-Kyu. the proper emergency response in the event of an incident at the nuclear station. Then, if you are away, your children will know what to do until you return. MONITOR AND PREPARE A type of precautionary action intended to advise the public within the EPZ that a serious emergency at the nuclear power plant .

Federal law requires nuclear operating companies to develop and maintain emergency preparedness plans for their nuclear power plants to protect the public. An emergency plan provides an additional layer of protection by specifying response actions that may be taken in the event of a serious accident .   According to guidelines prepared by a joint NRC/FEMA task force after the Three Mile Island accident in , power plant owners are responsible for onsite emergency planning, while state and local governments are responsible for offsite emergency planning. The NRC has overall authority for final review in both cases.   Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) The Emergency Planning Zone defined around the plant up to 16 km radius provide a basic geographic framework for decision making on implementing measures as part of a graded response in the event of an emergency. The population around a NPP has been limited by setting up the exclusion zone and Natural Growth Zone. An accident could result in dangerous levels of radiation that could affect the health and safety of the public living near the nuclear power plant. Local and state governments, federal agencies, and the electric utilities have emergency response plans in case of a nuclear power plant incident. The plans define two “emergency planning zones.”.

Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) The Emergency Planning Zone defined around the plant up to 16 km radius provide a basic geographic framework for decision making on implementing measures as part of a graded response in the event of an emergency. The population around a NPP has been limited by setting up the exclusion zone and Natural Growth Zone. The central zone is a planning area in which preparations are to be made for specific civil protection measures outlined in the Basic Recommendations, mainly staying indoors (sheltering), distribution and intake of iodine tablets, and evacuation. The central zone extends up to approximately 5 kilometres from operational nuclear power plants.. Local conditions, such as terrain, settlement.   The first, a Precautionary Action Zone covering a 5-km radius of a nuclear power plant, would require residents to immediately evacuate in the event of a rapidly developing nuclear accident.   Emergency Planning Zones. A keystone of any plant's preplanned protective action strategy involves two emergency planning zones (EPZs) around the plant. The EPZ's size and shape vary for each plant due to detailed consideration of the specific site conditions, unique geographical features of the area, and demographic information.